Strategic Divergence: A Problem with Proxy Warfare

A U.S. soldier speaking with a fighter from the Kurdish YPG in 2017 in northeastern Syria. (Photo: Delil Souleiman, AFP/Getty Images) By Kevin Truitte, Columnist Photo by: Getty Images The prevalence of inter-state war has declined since the end of the Second World War.[i] The Cold War and introduction of nuclear weapons witnessed the employment of … Continue reading Strategic Divergence: A Problem with Proxy Warfare

France and ISIS: Moving Forward

By: Alicia Chavy, Columnist Photo by: Reuters Between 2015 and 2017, France has experienced an array of devastating terrorist attacks carried out by Islamic State (IS) fighters or supporters. The November 2015 attack executed by eight IS militants in Paris that left 130 dead was a watershed event for France’s counterterrorism policies. The country realized … Continue reading France and ISIS: Moving Forward

The Bear’s Necessities: Russia’s Control, Exploitation, and Manipulation of Information

A screenshot of what appeared to be Russian ransomware affecting systems worldwide in June 2017. The Ukrainian government posted the shot to its official Facebook page. Via The New York Times By: Shawn Stefanick, Columnist On April 16, 2018, the U.S. and U.K. publicly blamed Moscow for a series of cyber intrusions into the backbone … Continue reading The Bear’s Necessities: Russia’s Control, Exploitation, and Manipulation of Information

Do Terrorist Groups Really Die? A Warning

 By: Antonia Ward, Columnist Photo by: Getty Images With the collapse of ISIS and loss of the majority of its territory in Syria and Iraq by the end of 2017, the world was relieved at the news of the “end” of the terrorist-cum-insurgent group.[i] This response paralleled a different, but not altogether dissimilar, celebration following … Continue reading Do Terrorist Groups Really Die? A Warning

Cycles of Violence in Myanmar: Is There Anything the International Community Can Do?

By: Mei Lim, Columnist Photo by: VOA Despite international opprobrium heaped on the Myanmar government for its treatment of the ethnic Rohingya minority in the country’s northern Rakhine state, cycles of violence in the region are likely to continue. The violence in the Rakhine state has largely been carried out by Myanmar’s military – the … Continue reading Cycles of Violence in Myanmar: Is There Anything the International Community Can Do?

As Ukraine and Poland Quarrel, Russia Benefits

By: Will Chim, Columnist Photo by: http://www.cam.ac.uk The recent deterioration of Poland and Ukraine’s relationship destabilizes not just what should be a strong Polish-Ukrainian alliance against Russian aggression, but broader political cooperation in Europe. While the discord has its roots in World War II, it is mainly aggressive rhetoric on both sides causing a dangerous … Continue reading As Ukraine and Poland Quarrel, Russia Benefits

Is Mutually Assured Destruction Back? It Never Left

By: Katie Earle Photo by: Reuters Earlier this month, Russian President Vladimir Putin delivered his annual address to the Federal Assembly, outlining his legislative priorities for the year ahead. Customarily the speech occurs in December, but this year the Kremlin delayed the event until March 1, just two weeks before yesterday's presidential election. Putin’s promises … Continue reading Is Mutually Assured Destruction Back? It Never Left

Ukraine Set to Go Ballistic

By Alexander Begej, Columnist Photo by: Ukraine Defense and Security Council The Ukrainian defense industry is on the verge of implementing several independently developed missile projects, which will enhance Ukraine’s tactical capabilities, strategic deterrence, and defense of maritime assets in the Black and Azov Seas. Advancements in Ukraine’s missile program Ukraine’s domestic missile program remained … Continue reading Ukraine Set to Go Ballistic

The Frozen Conflict in Transnistria: Why the West Should Pay Attention to Moldova

By: Shawn Stefanick, Columnist Photo by: Getty Images On February 17, 2018, at the annual Munich Security Conference, Moldovan Prime Minister Pavel Filip renewed his calls for Moscow to withdraw Russian troops from the Trans-Dniester Republic (commonly referred to as Transnistria), a Russian-backed separatist enclave in eastern Moldova.[i] Judging by the lack of discourse in … Continue reading The Frozen Conflict in Transnistria: Why the West Should Pay Attention to Moldova

Post-Karimov Reform in Uzbekistan: Illusion or Reality?

By: Will Chim, Columnist Photo by: Asia Times For two and half decades, the words “Uzbekistan” and “Karimov” were inextricable – one could not discuss the Central Asian country without mentioning its brutal leader. But since Uzbekistani President Islam Karimov’s death in 2017 after 25 years of rule, many are wondering what comes next. For … Continue reading Post-Karimov Reform in Uzbekistan: Illusion or Reality?